Neighborhoods / Mission Bay

Mission Bay

San Francisco’s newest neighborhood

Stand at the corner of 3rd Street and Mission Bay Boulevard, or 4th Street and China Basin. Stand almost anywhere in Mission Bay and take in the view: the gleaming mid-rise campus of UCSF’s Mission Bay Medical Center, surrounded by similarly sleek and modern condominium and apartment buildings in various stages of completion, serviced by myriad cranes and legions of construction workers. From here it’s almost impossible to imagine that only 20 years ago this was empty parcels, railroad yards and parking lots, seemingly light years from the hustle of downtown, which was actually only 20 minutes away on foot. Downtown is still 20 minutes away, but Mission Bay now seems anything but light years away. If anything, Mission Bay has become its own epicenter with a unique buzz all its own. Mission Bay has reimagined the urban neighborhood and it’s far from being finished.

Area Map

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Commute

Commuter Buses
Google, Electronic Arts, Apple and Facebook buses stop on King Street, just across Mission Creek from the northern border of Mission Bay.

SFMTA Buses
The T line runs through the heart of Mission Bay, north-south on 3rd Street.
SFMTA buses recently launched a line running east-west on 16th Street, called the 55. Otherwise, the T light rail handles north-south traffic. Other lines are in proximity to Mission Bay, located in South Beach.

Nearest CalTrain Station
4th and King Streets, just outside the borders of Mission Bay.

Nearest BART
Embarcadero

Estimated Commute Times
Financial District by bus/light rail: 20 minutes
Financial District on foot: 30 minutes
South San Francisco via auto: 20 minutes
Silicon Valley via auto: 50 minutes

Around the Block

Who Lives Here
Young, ambitious, well-educated professionals leaning toward careers in the sciences who enjoy proximity to downtown, SOMA and The Embarcadero.

Smart, ambitious, on the go: this is Mission Bay
Development in Mission Bay began in 1998 but the neighborhood didn’t hit its stride until 2003, when UCSF opened the doors of its Mission Bay campus, adding some 4,000 faculty, staff, students and patients to the new district. Since then, Mission Bay has added an impressive roster of biotech companies to its roster of local businesses and anticipates the arrival of Uber’s world headquarters, scheduled to break ground late in 2017 or early in 2018. As a result, Mission Bay has become the city’s headquarters for young, ambitious scientists and science industry workers, giving the neighborhood a brainy, youthful personality. Weekdays find the neighborhood teeming with on-the-go professionals who crowd its cafes at lunchtime and its running trails after work.

How They Live
Mission Bay locals live exclusively in condominiums, townhouses and apartment buildings and favor a pedestrian-friendly, active lifestyle.

Urban living without urban decay
Mission Bay is a breeding ground for ideas — and not only scientific ones. It’s no mistake that Mission Bay is scheduled to be the next home of the Golden State Warriors NBA franchise; the locals love their sports, be they team sports (as fans) or individual sports (as weekend warriors). Nor is it unusual that the most innovative new lunch, after work and apres ballgame spot in San Francisco is located in Mission Bay. The Yard at Mission Rock is a “pop-up shipping container village” that combines food trucks, beer gardens and shops carved out of repurposed shipping containers. It was an immediate hit upon its 2014 launch, a sunny day alternative to Mission Bay’s other outdoor mecca, The Ramp. Mission Bay is for strolling the Bay Trail, scaling the walls at Mission Rock, marveling at the funky houseboats moored in Mission Creek, picnicking at Bay Front Park, floating in a kayak and waiting for a Splash Hit at McCovey Cove. Given how hard they work from Monday to Friday, there simply aren’t enough hours in a weekend to exhaust the go-getters of Mission Bay.

Housing Market
A wide range of multi-unit buildings varying in size and price point, with more being added seemingly every day.

A bargain… for now
In Mission Bay, the old movie adage, “if you build it, they will come,” is a hard fast truth. Mission Bay is a planned community, and the plan was to provide housing targeted at young homebuyers with the long-term strategy of keeping them in the neighborhood throughout adulthood. You can purchase a smart, stylish one-bedroom condominium in Mission Bay, one with a view, an on-site fitness center and a community room in which to host parties, for well under $1 million. You can also purchase an equally smart, equally stylish but much larger home, two, three or even four bedrooms, likewise with a long list of on-site amenities, for less than $2 million. Right now Mission Bay is a bargain among San Francisco neighborhoods, offering proximity, in many cases beautiful views, spacious homes with outdoor space and community perks, at or around the city-wide median price. Better act fast, though; Mission Bay continues to gain in popularity, and inventory is low.

What To Expect
A San Francisco neighborhood like no other, bustling by day and by night, shining with a newness last seen around these parts over 100 years ago.

A neighborhood unlike its neighbors
Mission Bay is unlike any other neighborhood in San Francisco. It has a history, but it lives in the present — and the future. You won’t find rows of colorful Victorians, Edwardians, Beaux Arts buildings or other signature San Francisco architecture here, but you will find the latest in cutting-edge residential living and a lifestyle that seamlessly combines urban amenities with outdoor recreational opportunities. Mission Bay has vast coastline to explore, multiple parks, is adjacent to King Street’s lively commercial strip — not to mention AT & T Park — and is poised for exciting growth, advancing a trend that’s been happening since 1998, when the modern neighborhood first sprang to life. Does an active, busy, modern lifestyle sound good to you? Come to Mission Bay.

What Not To Expect
Single-family homes, “classic” San Francisco Victorian charm, visible history, peace and quiet during Giants home games.

No cable cars, no postcard row, no Fisherman’s Wharf
This is the new San Francisco, full of the seekers and dreamers who’ve always come to San Francisco, but with a twist: Mission Bay is not the land of colorful, creaky, charming old houses haunted with the ghosts of eccentrics from the Gold Rush to the Summer of Love. This is not where you will find paisley wallpaper hidden beneath seven coats of paint, where the sounds of fog horns and distant cable car bells break up the quiet of the night. You won’t find unrestored Victorians — or any single-family homes, for that matter — or suddenly learn that Mark Twain spent the night in your flat one day in 1866. Mission Bay is sleek, gleaming, contemporary. It is San Francisco’s future, the first neighborhood to establish itself in the city for over a century. Here you trade charm for efficiency; that might mean giving up your curved bay windows, but when was the last time you saw a Victorian with an on-site fitness center?

PERFECT FOR
Biotech and medical industry workers who want a walking commute; San Francisco Giants fans, outdoor enthusiasts, old salts, light rail users, those who can’t resist a San Francisco Bay view; lovers of crisp, contemporary architecture, non-drafty living quarters, new kitchen appliances and covered, secure parking spots; young professionals who are new to the city, San Francisco Giants players, boaters and kayakers, San Franciscans who like a “New York” feel.

NOT PERFECT FOR
People who came to San Francisco for the cable cars, the Victorians and the Irish Coffee, history buffs, anyone who must have a single-family house and/or a private back yard, lovers of “old school” restaurants, those who don’t think of a private terrace and a shared courtyard as “outdoor space,” people how absolutely need that “funky San Francisco vibe,” anyone intimidated by rows of mid-rise residential buildings, anti-growth advocates, lovers of historic homes.

You’ll Fall In Love With
The location — close to everything — the youthful energy, the sunny weather, the opportunities for a balanced work/life lifestyle, the innovation.

A Senor Sisig burrito, followed by the Anchor Steam beer garden after a Giants game on a sunny Saturday; the moment you realize there are two yacht clubs (Mariposa Hunter’s Point and Bayview) in Mission Bay and neither of them resembles the St. Francis Yacht Club in any way; the funky houseboats in Mission Creek; the feeling of possibility and ambition that pervades the entire neighborhood; bowling at Lucky Strike; lunch at The Ramp, casual shopping at the Farmers Market, bay views and bay trails, walking along The Embarcadero to the Ferry Building Farmer’s Market.

Places to go

The Yard
The Yard
3rd Street and Terry A Francois Boulevard

Come here not only to eat but also to drink and shop, courtesy of repurposed shipping containers and a bevy of food trucks.

The Ramp
The Ramp
855 Terry A Francois Boulevard

This longtime lunch and brunch spot is known for its glorious patio, where seating is very hard to come by on warm, sunny days.

MoMo’s
MoMo’s
760 2nd Street

Technically in South Beach, MoMo’s is the place to pre-function before Giants games and a fine place to follow up for dinner and/or a nightcap afterward.

Public House
Public House
24 Willie Mays Plaze

Upscale bar food, a vast beer menu and an unbeatable location — it’s built into the corner of AT & T Park.

Mission Rock Resort
Mission Rock Resort
817 Terry A Francois Plaza

Tremendous views are the setting for this two-level waterfront oyster bar and grill.

Pete’s Tavern/Pedro’s Cantina
Pete’s Tavern/Pedro’s Cantina
King Street

Mexican food and margaritas? A sports bar with scores of TVs and high quality pub food. It’s your choice at these co-joined spots.

Polo Grounds Pub and Grill
Polo Grounds Pub and Grill
747 3rd Street

Step away from the flash at this casual, unassuming, old-school watering hole… with tater tots!

Anchor Beer Garden
Anchor Beer Garden
The Yard

It’s not just for Giants games; the beer garden is open seven days a week from 11 AM to 9 PM.

Triple Voodoo Brewery
Triple Voodoo Brewery
2245 3rd Street

Just across the border in Dogpatch is the Triple Voodoo, a taproom with 16 rotating taps and bar snacks.

Third Rail
Third Rail
628 20th Street

A newcomer to the Dogpatch scene offering artisan cocktails, a groovy atmosphere, art and several different types of jerky.

Haagen-Dazs Ice Cream Shop
Haagen-Dazs Ice Cream Shop
24 Willie Mays Plaza

As if a ballgame wasn’t indulgent enough, enjoy some rich ice cream while you’re there.

Mr. and Mrs. Miscellaneous
Mr. and Mrs. Miscellaneous
699 22nd Street

Lovers of artisan ice cream and sweets can travel to Dogwatch for simple and complex flavors made in-house.

Mizu Spa
Mizu Spa
374 King Street

Pamper, rejuvenate, get a manicure and a massage, purchase some anti-aging serums? Why not? You deserve it.

SFMade
SFMade
The Yard

Locally made products from a rotating roster of pop-up tenants, including Les Mechantes, 3 Fish Studio, Lady Alamo and wildebeest.

North Face
North Face
The Yard

Everyone’s favorite outdoor and lifestyle clothing retailer saves you the trip downtown with its Mission Bay store.

Mission Bay Farmers Market
Mission Bay Farmers Market
4th Street at Gene Friend Way

Located on the UCSF campus, this mid-week farmers market has all of the organic produce you’d expect, and more.

Performance Bicycle
Performance Bicycle
635 Brannan Street

Retail bicycle products are a short stroll — or bike ride — away at this South of Market shop.

Flagship Dugout Store
Flagship Dugout Store
24 Willie Mays Plaza

Mission Bay residents can’t help but be Giants fans. Conveniently, Giants merchandise HQ is in the neighborhood.

Mariposa Hunters Point Yacht Club
Mariposa Hunters Point Yacht Club
405 Terry A Francois Boulevard

This long-time Mission Bay/China Basin fixture dispenses with the haughty in favor of enthusiasm.

Bay View Boat Club
Bay View Boat Club
489 Terry A Francois Boulevard

Neighbor to the MHPYC, the equally casual and boisterous Bayview Boat Club has been in place for over 60 years.

Lucky Strike San Francisco
Lucky Strike San Francisco
200 King Street

Bowling is back (or maybe it never left) and at Lucky Strike, bowling is hip, fun and very, very stylish.

Bakar Fitness and Recreation Center
Bakar Fitness and Recreation Center
1675 Owens Street

At UCSF Mission Bay. This center has it all — weights, cardio, trainers, Pilates, swimming, a climbing wall — and membership is open to the public.

My Gym
My Gym
901 Minnesota Street

Why not a gym for children? My gym has age-appropriate classes that “keep children fit by making fitness fun.”

Fit by Milo
Fit by Milo
290 Channel Street

Milo Susmilch offers the “ultimate interval training,” calls it “FitCamp” and promises to keep your body and mind engaged.

Vim and Vigor Salon
Vim and Vigor Salon
272 King Street

You’ll have to cross the bridge to find this stylish stylist, promising full-service hair care and post-styling tips.

Candace Cardella Skin Care
Candace Cardella Skin Care
1317 18th Street

Just over the border in Potrero Hill is this esthetician with a serious focus on skin care.

Envy Me Salon and Spa
Envy Me Salon and Spa
2075 3rd Street

Braiding, extensions, coloring, straightening and styling; all available at this Dogpatch location.

OMpower
OMpower
66 Townsend Street

Indoor cycling and yoga, leading to “transformation,” which happens “one ride, one stride, one breath at a time.”

Giggling Lotus Yoga
Giggling Lotus Yoga
2325 3rd Street #318

A small, community-based yoga studio dedicated to the “art of living well.”

UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay
UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay
1825 4th Street

What could be more inspiring than touring a first-class, cutting-edge medical facility? Tours are held on the first and third Fridays of each month.

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